The emotional center is the fastest of the four lower centers. This means that gaining control over emotions is the last barrier before fully penetrating the moment. We increase our ability to control emotions by resisting the expression of negativity. This video tutorial explores the effort of non-expression and explains its central role in transforming our identity from the many ‘I’s to real ‘I’.

Responses

  1. Shane Scanlon

    I find that the bulk of my negative emotions manifest in subtle ways. For the most part they are triggered by internal consideration rather than external stimuli. In struggling against these emotions, I find that their expression is also quite subtle. In my machine a feeling of irritation usually first expresses itself as a clenching of the jaw. If this goes unchecked the muscle tension will spread to my extremities. For example I may clench my fists. The next phase is seen in restless movement such as pacing in circles. At this point my thoughts are also going in circles.

    At each escalating phase of expression the struggle becomes more difficult. If I am able to observe my jaw clench a simple relaxing of the muscles will bring me back into the moment. If it has reached the phase of restless movement I will require purposeful movement or meditation to break my hypnosis.

    1. Asaf Braverman Post author

      This is an insight into how centers affect each other. First comes inner consideration, which is in the realm of emotions. Then comes muscular tension, which is in the realm of the body. So if you apply a physical effort only – relaxing the jaw muscles or moving more intentionally – you haven’t addressed the root. Inner consideration will return, and with it the muscular tension. But if you shed more light onto the root – observing inner consideration at the moment it is occurring – along with relaxing muscular tension, then this will be a more comprehensive effort, with deeper results.

      That said, the physical body is much easier to observe, so we often begin by capturing a physical trait such as unnecessary muscular tension, and work our way back to its root.

      Keep up the good work!