Style Guide

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Beperiod.com Style Guide

The aim of this document is to bring more consistency to the expression of the teaching that we wish to convey through BePeriod. It draws inspiration from the style of writing in The Fourth Way and In Search of the Miraculous. Note that this is a guide, and that exceptions are not infringements.

Consistency in grammar, spelling, and punctuation prevents unnecessary friction for the reader’s intellect. For this reason, avoid using both capitalized and un-capitalized, quoted and unquoted, or italicized and non-italicized versions of the same words in the same context.

Naming

For linguistic and historical reasons, many people quoted on BePeriod have names that may be spelled in different ways: George Gurdjieff, Gurdjieff, Mr. Gurdjieff and G; Peter Ouspensky, Piotr Uspenkii, Pyotr Uspenski, Mr. Ouspensky, Mr. O and O.

The spelling and naming conventions for these are as follows:
George Gurdjieff or Gurdjieff, Peter Ouspensky or Ouspensky, Rodney Collin or Collin, Maurice Nicoll or Nicoll, etc.

The same naming conventions will apply for other writers, artists, musicians, philosophers, statesmen and people of note whom we wish to quote.

For aristocracy and clergy, titles will be capitalized: Queen Elizabeth ll, King Ferdinand, Pope Pius IX, Bernard of Clairvaux, etc. If referring to these types of individuals more than once, using first name is acceptable.

Capitalization of Words

Words will be left un-capitalized unless required by the following guides.

The first word of a sentence is always capitalized.

Nouns referring to people and places need capitalization. For example: Peter Ouspensky, George Gurdjieff, London, Paris, Cappadocia, Times Square Station, etc. For clarification, search for ‘proper noun’.

Work I’s will be capitalized and followed by a period; when in a sequence, they are separated by a comma. The verb ‘Be’ will be capitalized when used to refer to being present. Examples:

  • Sometimes the effort is as simple as using the word ‘Hear.’ while listening to music.
  • Our prayer will be ‘I, Want, To, Be, Serious, I’.
  • We will aim to see why our effort to Be must include an element of self-observation.

When we present the sequence of work I’s in its classical form, only long ‘BE’ is written as shown.

Avoid ALL CAPS wherever possible.

Some examples:

  • Example: The Feature of Vanity limits our efforts “To BE”
    Preferred: The feature of vanity limits our efforts to Be
  • Example: In order to be, we must separate from the Many “I”s
    Preferred: In order to Be, we must separate from the many I’s.
  • Example: ...my experience is that Higher Consciousness wants Itself to be shared with others.
    Preferred: ….my experience is that higher consciousness wants itself to be shared with others.
  • Example: Our “job” is to see the way to use all events, internal and external, in our life as reminders for Presence.
    Preferred: Our ‘job’ is to see the way to use all events, internal and external, in our life as reminders for presence.
  • Examples: Excess Talking, Daydreams and Fantasies (Imagination), Self Pity and Self Deprecation, Expression of Negative Emotions.
    Preferred: excess talking, daydreams and fantasies (imagination), self-pity and self-deprecation, expression of negative emotions.

Spelling and Grammar

Where conflicts occur, American English spelling will be used, rather than British English. For example: the American spellings of  'color' and 'honor' are used, rather than the British 'colour' and 'honour'; the American suffix -ize (‘emphasize’) is used instead of the British -ise, (‘emphasise’).

The fourth way terminology does not require capitalization. See Capitalization above for clarification. Following is an example of current usage followed by the beperiod.com preferred grammar and spelling:

Example: No, Will does not come on it's own, it is developed by right Aim, right Work and right efforts, little by little. I have taken Gurdjieff’s suggestion and make a Work plan for a three month period. I then reinforce those aims daily and review them at the end of a day. Little daily wills with exercises for all of the lower centers(and then acting on those aims in the moment by dividing attention) can possibly e lead to accessing the Higher Emotional Center, where Will already exists.

Preferred: No, will does not come on it’s own, it is developed by right aim, right work and right efforts, little-by-little. I have taken Gurdjieff’s suggestion of making a work plan for a three month period. I then reinforce those aims daily and review them at the end of a day. Little daily wills with exercises for all of the lower centers (and then acting on those aims in the moment by dividing attention) can possibly lead to accessing the higher emotional center, where will already exists.

Quotation Marks

Double quotation marks are used to attribute a phrase to someone.

Single quotation marks are used to emphasize a phrase, often to give it a special meaning.

Fourth way terminology should not be emphasized by default, though single quotation marks can help clarify text that would otherwise be ambiguous.

Some examples:

  • From the post above, “We get what we want.” – have you verified this?
  • We all have to ‘stop’ sometimes.
  • I had the ‘I’ that I should call my mother.
  • The I to call my mother prevailed, and the phone was in my hand.
  • This is what I mean by ‘right’ work of centers.
  • Try using the I, Drop.

As always, try to maintain consistent style within the same context.

References

Much of this guide is based on the styles found in In Search of the Miraculous and The Fourth Way by Peter Ouspensky. For clarification on style, spelling, punctuation or grammar, refer to these books.

 

The art of art, the glory of expression and the sunshine of the light of letters, is simplicity.

~ Walt Whitman

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